Economic

Simple understanding of business start up and tax incentives

So I just have to share my thoughts on this very topic as I keep seeing and hearing the argument from people who are not familiar in general business practice or even how businesses become a business…

Or how they always say that, “These are a ‘tax break’ for ‘big businesses’ only!”

First of all, let me say this… Big businesses used to start off small whether they started out as a corner store, mom and pop shop, out of your back yard, out of your garage, etc. This list can go on. The common logic approach, which I have noticed quite a lot is missing now-a-days, if these small businesses become more successful in what they do – they will grow bigger and eventually become a ‘big business’ that people tend to complain about.

And what do these small business that become a bigger business do? They provide job opportunities to everyone who just want to have a job, that do not have the drive or wish to be a business owner or to open, own and operate a business.

That’s why business owners are also called ‘entrepreneurs’.

This is the exact definition of what an ‘Entrepreneur’ is.

This goes back to my prior blog about what types of businesses are out there: President Biden’s Economic Policies

These business owners take all the financial risk in their business throughout the lifetime of operating their business. What do I mean by financial risk? They usually use their OWN MONEY to fund their business. I mean usually, some other business owners would take out a business loan (but still they use their own money generated back from their business to pay that loan back).

So there are many tax laws provided by the Federal Government, State Governments and local County or City Governments which provide incentives for these business owners to start or have their business in said city or state.

One of many which I won’t get into because the Federal Tax laws are in a whole other field of their own… are business start up costs. A simple explanation of business start up costs you can peruse on your own below and in the link provided.

Now, lets talk about tax incentives… Many cities or states provide various tax incentives for businesses to come to their location. Why? So these specific businesses provide jobs and additional opportunities to people who live in these locations that the business is possibly looking to move to.

It benefits the local community as a whole if that particular business moves there because: 1 – They provide job opportunities to people locally, 2 – Can help the local community be revived if it is at a standstill, 3 – can actually help other businesses in the surrounding environment.

A couple of examples I have experienced directly.

  1. Amazon over the past 2 to 4 years upgraded or replaced their delivery vehicles in our area.
    1. Newer Amazon delivery trucks are driving by when making deliveries locally. Many people, I’ve seen on social media, complained about Amazon not paying taxes or reporting $0 in taxes being paid. Well, many of these people do not realize that Amazon replaced or upgraded their delivery trucks – which in turn is a tax deduction for tax reasons under the Federal Government tax law. So maybe that is one of the reasons why they had little to no taxes paid because Amazon replaced their fleet of delivery vehicles – probably across the nation. Newer trucks means the Amazon people making those deliveries can get to you rather than using a beat up vehicle that can break down or their own vehicle that could break down (as well) while making deliveries because they’re carrying a lot of packages.
  2. Local big name car dealership in Georgetown helping local businesses and the surrounding communities
    1. This car dealership has survived in the Georgetown area for 50+ years and always gave back to the local surrounding communities to help the area stay alive and thrive. What’s an example? Well this car dealership provides free advertising for the smaller businesses in the area and spreads these advertising to the people who come to their dealership whether or not they are purchasing a car from them. And because they advertised these local businesses the businesses themselves are still open and thriving with all the foot traffic brought to them.
  3. Another example I have for you, an automotive repair shop – Austin Automotive – they’re one of many local repair shops in the Central Texas area. They have various locations in the Central Texas area but they could be a small business and you (yourself) may not know that. Just on the surface you could see this repair shop and automatically think – “Oh this is a big business! I do not like them.” But hold on… have some common sense here. What is considered a small business? Please see below of what is considered a small business from the IRS and from American Society for Quality (ASQ):

So a small business can be any of the below (as indicated above from the IRS and ASQ)

  1. IRS – the business owning business assets under $10,000,000 (basically the equipment, building/store front, etc.)
  2. 500 employees or less (Manufacturing and mining)
  3. 100 employees or less (Wholesale Trade)
  4. $6,000,000 in average annual revenue (Retail and Service industries)
  5. $28,500,000 in average annual revenue (General and Heavy construction industries)
  6. $12,000,000 in average annual revenue (Special Trade Contractors)
  7. $750,000 in average annual revenue (Agriculture)

Generally speaking, tax incentives are provided to all businesses regardless if the city or state wants that particular business to come to them (big OR small). And having these businesses come to the local areas (regardless if their big business or small business) these businesses and I will repeat this again…

It benefits the local community as a whole if that particular business moves there because: 1 – They provide job opportunities to people locally, 2 – Can help the local community be revived if it is at a standstill, 3 – can actually help other businesses in the surrounding environment.

I mean honestly, people who complain and moan about big business not paying taxes or have so many tax incentives do not realize the cause and effect of it all. How does it affect YOU personally? It does not. Why? Because you will usually pay the same amount of taxes almost each year.

These businesses pay a lot in taxes after the fact (AFTER) the tax incentives are passed their time – they usually have a set time frame of when tax incentives expire when the businesses takes off – become profitable, grows, etc.

So what does it matter to you if these businesses (small or big) don’t pay taxes now? The businesses will pay taxes later on and usually a hell of a lot more than you do as a person.

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